Sunday, April 23, 2017

WORLD BOOK DAY

Today, April 23, is World Book Day. 
For me, books have been an enduring pleasure. Reading transports me to other worlds and makes me laugh and cry, has horrified and comforted.

Also reading made me a writer. Not that I thought I could create better stories and characters than writers I enjoyed reading, but as an avenue to create my own worlds.

Here are quotes gathered from Brainy QuoteFlavorWire and Good Reads.
 “The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.”  — Jane Austen
“Reading is a conversation. All books talk. But a good book listens as well.” — Mark Haddon
“Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.” ― Groucho Marx

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” ― C.S. Lewis
“If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.” ― Oscar Wilde
“There is no friend as loyal as a book.” ― Ernest Hemingway


“Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.” ― Charles William Eliot
“Only the very weak-minded refuse to be influenced by literature and poetry.” ― Cassandra Clare
“There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.” — Ray Bradbury

“Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn't carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.” ― Stephen King
“Books are like mirrors: if a fool looks in, you cannot expect a genius to look out.” ― J.K. Rowling


Happy Reading!



Friday, April 7, 2017

At The Masters: Augusta National - A Gardener's Delight

First I would like to see Couples or Michelson win - the more experienced players. But Jason Day would be fine, too.

Now to my topic: The garden that can make a good walk fine, no matter how you play.

The August National Golf Course was formerly a plant nursery and each hole on the course is named after the tree or shrub with which it has become associated. Several of the holes on the first nine have been renamed.

First Nine (Masters’ folks don’t like the term “front nine.”)

First Tee: Tea Olive; Second: Pink Dogwood; Third: Flowering Peach; Fourth: Flowering Crab Apple;

Magnolia



Fifth: Magnolia; Sixth: Juniper; Seventh: Pampas; Eighth: Yellow Jasmine; Ninth: Carolina Cherry.

Second Nine

Tenth hole: Camellia; Eleventh: White Dogwood; Twelfth: Golden Bell; Thirteenth: Azalea; Fourteenth: Chinese Fir; Fifteenth: Firethorn; Sixteenth: Redbud; Seventeenth: Nandina; Eighteenth: Holly.

Azalea

Unlike most other private or public golf courses in the United States, Augusta National has never been rated. During the 1990 Masters Tournament, a team of USGA raters, organized by Golf Digest, evaluated the course and gave it an unofficial rating of 76.2. It was re-evaluated in 2009 and given an unofficial rating of 78.1.

The golf course architecture website GolfClubAtlas.com has said, “Augusta National has gone through more changes since its inception than any of the world’s twenty or so greatest courses. To call it a MacKenzie course is false advertising as his features are essentially long gone and his routing is all that is left.” The architects, it is said, was strongly influenced by the Old Course at St Andrews, and intended that the ground game be central to the course.

However, almost from Augusta’s opening, Roberts sought to make changes to minimize the ground game, and effectively got free rein to do so because MacKenzie died shortly after the course’s opening and Jones went into inactivity due to World War II and then a crippling illness. The authors add, “With the ground game gone, the course was especially vulnerable to changes in technology, and this brought on a slew of changes from at least 15 different ‘architects’.
Source: Wikipedia.


Enjoy the Game!



Gerrie Ferris Finger




Sunday, December 11, 2016

AMERICAN NIGHTS .

"Saudi Arabian prince, Husam al Saliba, hires child-finder Moriah Dru to find his missing American wife, Reeve, and daughter, Shahrazad.



The investigation begin when Husam tells of falling in love with Reeve, of turning his back on his ascendancy to the Saudi power structure for the woman he loves. He talks of his king’s disapproval of him marrying and siring an infidel.

But does he really want to return to the good graces of the royal family and marry cousin Aya and be an heir to kingship? Confused Dru thinks she’s fallen into a fairy tale. After all the prince is fond of reciting tales from the Arabian Nights.

The investigation had just begun when Reeve’s parents, Lowell and Donna Cresley were  killed. They hated their prince son-in-law. He is immediately suspected when the Atlanta police, in the person of Dru's lover Lt. Richard Lake, come into the case.


It’s soon evident infidelity abounds and everyone has something dreadful to hide.


http://amzn.to/29jOnRa
http://bit.ly/29eFsgJ

Thanks and Happy Reading!

Gerrie Ferris Finger
SHOOTING THE DEAD - New ebook
http://bit.ly/1TSL05F
http://amzn.to/1WWg7gW


Tuesday, December 6, 2016

THE ORIGIN OF THE PARTRIDGE IN A PEAR TREE



There is one Christmas Carol that has always puzzled me. What do leaping lords, French hens, swimming swans, and especially the partridge who won't come outof the pear tree, have to do with Christmas?


According to Wikipedia, the meaning of The Twelve Days of Christmas has yet to be satisfactorily explained. According to The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes, "Suggestions have been made that the gifts have significance, as representing the food or sport for each month of the year. Importance [certainly has] long been attached to the Twelve Days, when, for instance, the weather on each day was carefully observed to see what it would be in the corresponding month of the coming year. Nevertheless, whatever the ultimate origin of the chant, it seems probable [that] the lines that survive today both in England and France are merely an irreligious travesty."

On the other hand, modern folklore claims that the song's lyrics were written as a catechism song to help young Catholics learn their faith, at a time when practicing Catholicism was discouraged in England (1558 until 1829). In this catechism version there are two levels of meaning: the surface meaning plus a hidden meaning known only to members of the church. Each element in the carol has a code word for a religious reality which the children could remember.

-The partridge in a pear tree was Jesus Christ.
-Two turtle doves were the Old and New Testaments.
-Three French hens stood for faith, hope and love.
-The four calling birds were the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke & John.
-The five golden rings recalled the Torah or Law, the first five books of the Old Testament.
-The six geese a-laying stood for the six days of creation.
-Seven swans a-swimming represented the sevenfold gifts of the Holy Spirit--Prophesy, Serving, Teaching, Exhortation, Contribution, Leadership, and Mercy.
-The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes.
-Nine ladies dancing were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit--Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness, and Self Control.
-The ten lords a-leaping were the ten commandments.
-The eleven pipers piping stood for the eleven faithful disciples.
-The twelve drummers drumming symbolized the twelve points of belief in the Apostles' Creed.
Even if it's lore - and who's to say? - it's good lore.


Merry Christmas.

Gerrie Ferris Finger


Sunday, October 2, 2016

Razzing and Roaring at the Ryder Cup

I love the Ryder Cup, what golfer doesn't?
 
I have favorite players on both sides--the Euros and the Americans, but no matter how much I admire Henrik Stenson,, I hope he loses to Jordan Spieth.
 
But my favorite moment in this year's tumultuous games--including the arrogant bowing and shushing of the American crowd by the European  players and booing of McIlroy--was when a heckler challenged a couple  of European pros to a putting contest. From the crowd at a practice round, he made wise crack remarks about how they couldn't sink a 12-foot putt.
 
So my favy Euro golfer, Henrik Stenson, grabbed David Johnson from North Dakota out of the crowd and handed him a putter. Euro Justin Rose laid a $100 bill on the grass. The crowd laughed as the amateur plumb-bobbed the putt--who does that anymore?--and took his stance. With a firm roll, Johnson sank the ball.
   
So, how did a heckler in the crowd manage to sink a shot that two champion golfers simply couldn’t?
“I closed my eyes, swallowed my puke and hit the putt,” Johnson said. “It happened to go in.”

I can relate, except I don't puke--ladies don't--but I waver a bit on key putts with cash on them.

Now back to the  one-upsmanship match play exhibited by American Reed and Euro McIlroy. What would that gentleman of the game, Arnie Palmer, say?

Happy Golfing.

Gerrie Ferris Finger

 

Monday, September 26, 2016

ARNOLD PALMER - Long live The King!

Arnold Palmer made a country club sport popular for the everyman. Through his remarkable life, he never lost that personal touch. That's what made him The King.

Palmer died Sunday in Pittsburgh. He was 87.

"Arnold transcended the game of golf," Jack Nicklaus said. "He was more than a golfer...  He was an icon. He was a legend. He took the game from one level to a higher level, virtually by himself. Along the way, he had millions of adoring fans.




Alastair Johnston, the CEO of Arnold Palmer Enterprises, said Palmer was admitted to the UPMC Hospital on Thursday for some cardiovascular work and weakened over the last few days.

Beyond his golf, Palmer was a pioneer in sports marketing, paving the way for scores of other athletes to reap  millions from endorsements. Some four decades after his last PGA Tour win, he ranked among the highest-earners in golf. It is not an exaggeration to say there would be no modern-day PGA Tour without Arnold Palmer. Golfers would still be wearing plus-fours, coats and ties. Hmmmm, what would John Daly wear?

Palmer would hitch up his pants, drop a cigarette and attack the flags. With powerful hands wrapped around the golf club, Palmer would slash at the ball with all of his might, twist that muscular neck and squint to see where it went. "When he hits the ball, the earth shakes,"Gene Littler once said. Palmer rallied from seven shots behind to win a U.S. Open. He blew a seven-shot lead on the back nine to lose a U.S.Open. His fans lovin' him all the way.

He was never dull And he never liked being referred to as "The King," but the name stuck. "It was back in the early '60s. I was playing pretty good, winning a lot of tournaments, and someone gave a speech and referred to me as 'The King,'" Palmer said in a November 2011 interview with The Associated Press."I don't bask in it. I don't relish it. I tried for a long time to stop that and," he said, pausing to shrug, "there was no point."

He was equally successful off with golf course design, a wine collection, and apparel that included his famous logo of an umbrella. He "invented" the Arnold Palmer, an ice tea and lemonade concoction. PGA star, Padraig Harrington recalls eating in an Italian restaurant in Miami when he heard a customer order one.

"Think about it," Harrington said. "You don't go up there and order a 'Tiger Woods' at the bar. You can go up there and order an 'Arnold Palmer' in this country and the barman — he was a young man — knew what the drink was. That's in a league of your own."

A league of his own, for sure.

Gerrie Ferris Finger
With Doug Fergerson, The Associated Press

Sunday, September 4, 2016

Marilyn's Musings: HOW AMERICAN NIGHTS GOT ITS TITLE by Gerrie Ferris...

Marilyn's Musings: HOW AMERICAN NIGHTS GOT ITS TITLE by Gerrie Ferris...: Thanks Marilyn for inviting me to your blog and to write about my new release American Nights on August 17. American Nights is ...